Bantam Chicken Coops [Best & Why] Space Needed, Roosting Height…

Bantam chickens are perfect for a small backyard, where space might be a premium. It’s possible to fit two bantams where you could only have normally got one standard bird. Meaning you can double your fun!

Bantams are no different to raising standard size birds and most Bantams have a regular sized counterpart, like Rhode Island Reds or Cochins do, but Bantams do have a few specific requirements when it comes to coops.

We keep some Cochins on our farm and they are amazing so friendly & loving.Cochin Bantams

Housing Bantams

You work on mainly the same principles as keeping any other chickens, just less ground space is required [as they are smaller] but need slightly more vertical space and they like to fly.

Not fly like superman, more of a jump whilst flap their wings several times; it maybe last for a couple of seconds. So they do really like their ‘upward’ run space.

We have had tons of coops on our farm over the years, we have been raising chicken for 4 generations, never commercially, only ever just our own supply of fresh free range organic farmhouse eggs.

Can Bantams live with standard sized chickens?

Yes. We have some in with our chickens and they all get on fine. I wouldn’t place more than 1 male in with less than 8 hens however. This can cause them to ‘macho fight’ over the ladies.

Every breed ratio is different but generally 8:1 works well so that’s 1 male [rooster/cockerel] for every 8 hens.

How much space do bantams need?

Bantams require floor space of 2sqft per bird in the coop, where they will roost (sleep). Then slightly more in the run at 4sqft per bird. These are minimums the more space you can afford any animal they will love you for it, chickens are no different. Generally as a rule of thumb, the run size is twice the coop space.

Bantams need about 6-8 inches roosting space (that’s the bar they sleep on). That’s roosting width space, so think wing to wing. During the winter they will huddle up to stay warm and during the summer do the opposite, to keep cool.

Don’t waste money…[like we did at first]

Having had so many coops, now I know what works and I know what doesn’t. Sadly what doesn’t work has ended up costing up money – money down the drain.

We have had leaking roofs after only a couple months even a chicken pop door break after just a few days to name but a few issues.

Strict buying criteria

So now I’ve a strict criteria for purchasing bantam chicken coops and ill share it with you below so you can follow it to buy yourself the best one!

6 key points to follow when buying a coop for Bantams

  1. Ventilation

More often than not this is over looked, which is why I’ve started with it. Ventilation is absolutely critical even if you live in a cold climate and that’s because ventilation should not = a draught. You do not want a draught this will cause your chicken to get sick, catch cold and stop laying or worse.

So most people think of ventilation as just the flow of air into the coop, to perhaps, only cool it during summer. True(ish) but that’s not the whole story. Lets me explain:

Heat like humidity travels hot to cold or high to low. Meaning when its hotter outside the coop than within, the direction of airflow with be outward. The heat will therefore be exiting to the cooler air outside. So its this removal of hot air that actually has the cooling effect within coops!

This same direction of airflow is what will rid the coop of excess moisture.

Chickens will poop in the coop and this can cause moisture build up so having adequate ventilation will solve this issue.

One more point, Ammonia is also found in chicken poop, if levels are left to build up within the coop, this can cause Bantams to have respiratory problems.

Having good ventilation with regulate the temperature of the coop, remove excessive moisture and rid it of unwanted ammonia.

Understand now why having good ventilation in a coop is so important?

I recommend coops further on down with exactly what you need, so keep on reading.

  1. Predator Proofing

Keeping Bantams safe, healthy and happy is a priority. Keeping out unwanted guests is therefore paramount. Guests like Coyotes, Foxes, Raccoons etc all are a threats to your lovely Bantams. You therefore will need:

  • Strong chicken wire surrounding the run area
  • A sturdy design so nothing can rip or tear its way in
  • Locks on the doors or nest boxes can add extra security
  1. Robust

Being robust works hand in hand with being predator proof but also because its more likely to last. Longevity is key, as the coop is the most expensive part about raising chickens. There is no getting around it, they need somewhere to live!

I mean you’ve heard the saying you get what you pay for well generally with coops the more you pay the best materials and design you get. Not all the time but like 99.9{cfcd481556a8b43fba6af451761032bd323e94372a0c1e607}.

Bare in mind chicken coops have a tough little life, you buy them brand new and then they sit outside in the sun, rain snow wind, sometimes for years on end!

So we want that sweet spot with, something that will last, but that doesn’t hurt our pockets.

  1. Design

If you live in a hot area or a wet one, the roof is going to be an important factor. Chickens don’t like getting wet and so they will need a good roof.

This roof will then offer them shade to escape the midday sun. Bantams can easily suffer from heat exhaustion so providing shade is paramount.

This will also be where you can place down or hang up the waterer. Chicken prefer cool water so keeping it the shade will keep it cooler for longer.

To be able to access the nesting boxes from the outside is a great design feature. Just lift up the lid and collect those lovely eggs each day.

Easy access will mean you can clean the coop without any issues. I mean its the chore that no one likes so make it easy on yourself.

  1. Nesting boxes

It’s a complete myth that each Bantam needs its own nesting box. One nesting box for 4-5 chickens is required. They will all pick a favorite and probably only use that ONE anyway. No idea why, chickens are cute funny creatures!

  1. Roost Height

They are small birds so you are probably thinking they won’t want to climb up into a coop or even be off the floor – wrong!

Bantams roost at 2-4+ ft off the ground! So we need a coop that’s off the floor with the roosting bars at the correct height.

OK so that’s buying criteria sorted, I’ve now drawn up a short list of the best chicken coops specifically for Bantams that fit the criteria, so all you have to is pick one:

Best Bantam Chicken Coops

The Best Budget Friendly One with Run! [upto 4 Bantams [or 2 Bantams with 1 Standard Sized]]

budget bantam chicken coop

  • Good sized vents that you can slide to adjust.
  • Easy access nesting box
  • Chicken pop door can be closed from the outside using a metal handle
  • Roof space over the whole run and coop
  • Economical use of space, with run under coop housing, good if backyard space is limited
  • Run door, if you want to let them out to roam or free range them
  • Good roosting height off the floor
  • Ample run height

The Best Walk in – Pets Imperial [good for 6 Bantams [or 2 Bantams and 2 Standard Sized]]

pets imperial chicken coop for 4 chickens

  • Walk in door to access run area
  • Easy access nesting box
  • Galvanized litter tray, so it won’t rot
  • Shade under coop housing
  • Large run area with great height space
  • Easy access reach in Perspex covered door into coop housing area. This will allow natural light in too.
  • Roof covers whole housing and run and is lined
  • Chicken door with metal handle
  • Animal friendly treated timber

Best Plastic Bantam Chicken Coop – Omlet Range [1-10 Bantams]

Omlet chicken coop for 4 chickens

Not sold on plastic let me run through just 3 benefits:

  1. Easy to clean, will help with red mite
  2. Wont rot – long lifespan
  3. Doesn’t need to be treated, sanded back or vanished

These coops can come with or without runs and can be placed on a frame. Plus wheels can be fitted to turn it into a tractor. Neat

Most Sturdy Designed Coop – OverEz [3 different sized coops to pick from [1-15 Bantams]]

chicken coop for 4 chickens

Lovely vintage barn red color

Roof slopes to rear keeping water away from the nesting boxes

Roost bars at two different heights – that’s great for Bantams

Window(s) for good ventilation, but covered with screens for protection

Very very sturdy and solid design that will last and keep predators out too

Doors etc can be locked in the open and closed position

Inner roof is lined with reflective barrier to keep the coop cool during summer

Resin treated floor and siding to help combat moisture

Wheels and run can be added.

Most Flexible Chicken Coop – Giantex [1-15+ Bantams]

chicken run for 12 chickens

This set up is actually how we house our Cochins. It’s perfect if you want to keep them safe but give them the freedom to roam and forage.

  • Light weight and easy to move
  • Available in different sizes to fit your backyard requirements
  • Any coop of any size can be placed into it or along side
  • Easy fitting of light weight galvanized (non-rusting) poles with holes to secure it into the ground
  • Plastic coated metal wire surrounds it keeping everything inside safe
  • Includes rain and sun UV stabilized protective cover
  • Walk in door with latch and metal ties for extra security

You can add even more security by running an electric fence round the perimeter like we have done. We have no issues at all using this set up.

chicken coop with electric fence

Please ignore the duck it likes hanging around with the Bantams!

We love Bantams, so I sure hope this guide to buying ‘The Best Bantam Chicken Coop’ has helped you.

Buying the Coop before buying your chicks or chickens… – good idea.

I recommend Cackle Hatchery they ship out across all states, are really helpful and super knowledgeable.

It’s a 3rd generation business so they really do know their stuff but mainly I like them as they have a HUGE selection of Bantams.

The great reviews speak for themselves have a look here for yourself!